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Wilderness association welcomes archaeologist to talk Hi-line history next week

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Next week the Montana Wilderness Association’s Island Range Chapter welcomes an expert archaeologist who will talk about some of the history of the culture and the resources of Montana’s Hi-line.

Josh Chase with the Bureau of Land Management will speak at the Darkhorse Hall at the Celtic Cowboy in Great Falls next Wednesday from 7 to 8:30 p.m. There also will be a social hour from 6 to 7.

According to the news release, Chase will discuss how “Montana’s Hi-Line has a long, proud, colorful and sometimes difficult history stretching back thousands of years. From the earliest inhabitants to the homesteaders, all brought change and all left their mark on the landscape.”

Evidence of human use can be found across the Hi-Line ranging from teepee rings and artifacts to old homesteads and remnants of oil recovery.

The earliest inhabitants were followed by the arrival of the plains Indians. Then, just a little over 200 years ago, the Lewis and Clark expedition opened the door for fur traders, miners, and finally homesteaders. All brought change and all left their mark on the landscape.

Chase grew up in Cody, Wyo. During the past decade he served as a Paratrooper in the US
Army which included time in Iraq. He is a graduate of the University of Wyoming. He and his wife Jennifer
have two young boys and also manage a saddle shop.
The Montana Wilderness Association’s Island Range Chapter, according to it’s website, “engages members and volunteers to protect special wild places in central and eastern Montana.”

Some of the best known wild places that the chapter represents include the Rocky Mountain Front, island ranges like the Little Belt and Big Snowy Mountains, and prairie wildlands including the CM Russell National Wildlife Refuge, Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument and other prairie wildlands managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

For more info check out the Montana Wilderness Association on Facebook.

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