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Post Death Soundtrack’s ‘The Unlearning Curve’ a creepy album that evokes raw emotion

Vancouver-based act similar to Bowie, Portishead

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If you’re about to listen to Post Death Soundtrack, you’re expecting dark, brooding music before a single note is played. The good news is that on their album “The Unlearning Curve,” they’ve lived up to their name and some.

This Vancouver-based industrial band revels in unsettling emotions through much of the album. If it’s the creepy chanting on “Beauty Eyes I Adore,” or the David Bowie-esque singing style on “That Which Is,” you’ll go through “The Unlearning Curve” feeling dank, unspeakable eeriness.

“You Can’t Go Back” sticks out thanks to it’s powerful electric guitar and lyric “You can’t go back, the system is out of order” which fit together well.

“Dance With the Devil” starts slowly, maybe a little too slowly, but the upside to that is when the vocals kick in, it comes with a surprising impact. It’s a song where the verses layer on top of one another and the intensity builds subtly. The chorus line “Dance With the Devil” is somewhat of a cliche and for that reason it doesn’t really do much for me, but I like the layering structured around it.

The album ends with another strong track, “Transform in White Light.” It’s got that Cure feel to it fueled by effective synthesizers and prominent drum tracks. The lyrics sit in the background, but that’s all right because it’s more of a mood track than a story-driven one.

POST DEATH SOUNDTRACK promo1Listening to the entire album, which comes out on May 27, there’s not a bad track among them. It’s definitely an album where you’ll either love it or hate it, but the elements the band use all are done for a specific purpose and they make you feel something, usually in a way that gets under your skin.

“The Unlearning Curve” comes after the band took a three-year hiatus. The band describes the album, saying “Equal parts Alice in Wonderland, J. Krishnamurti and dream language, The Unlearning Curve pulls as much from psych era Beatles and David Bowie as it does from modern industrial rock.”

I must admit I didn’t expect to enjoy the album as much as I did, but I’m thankful that I gave it a fair shot because it evoked things from me I don’t normally find myself feeling from any album.

You can find more from Post Death Soundtrack on Instagram, Facebook and BandCamp.

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