Home»A FEATURED STORY»Port of Est creates artful songs that encapsulate nature and its beauty on ‘Onyx Moon’
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Port of Est creates artful songs that encapsulate nature and its beauty on ‘Onyx Moon’

Portland-based band releases EP April 26

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The first thing that stands out on Port of Est’s dreamy “Onyx Moon,” is lead singer Hannah Tarkinson’s captivating phrasings and melodic choices.

The lead singer of the Portland, Main, band has a voice that drives the album, while  the beats and instrumentals serve as complementary elements. The best example of this would be the track “Valentine in My Headphones.”

It’s a track that may remind you of a cold morning watching the sun rise out in the forest while camping with your companion, or when you found out that your crush from third grade liked you back and wanted to go to a movie with you.

In a recent interview, Tarkinson described the sound on the album, saying “It’s a collage of sonic lore with the common thread being the heart. There’s big beats and bass, jazz elements, folk, noise, EDM, and lush synth/guitar haze produced with a pop sensibility. It’s music to think about, but you could also throw down on the dance floor.”

All those descriptions seem apt, if a bit humbling. Port of Est also sounds a bit like Phantogram, Lana Del Rey, and Massive Attack, among other influences. Listening to the tracks you can’t help but visualize the music if it were physical art, complete with lush reds, greens, oranges and purples all swirling together in creative harmony.

Before I watched the video for “Valentine in My Headphones,” I had that impression. It felt validating, then, when I watched the video and found a lot of what I pictured the music to be visually displayed in front of my eyes.

Take a look for yourself below:

Now, does Port of Est do anything amazingly groundbreaking? No, not really, but they have created music on “Onyx Moon” that’s inspiring to hear, and sometimes that’s just as good.

Each track sounds a little different while fitting the same feel. “Lupine” has more of a dance track sound to it while “Sister Wolves” is mostly pop-based. I challenge anyone to find a weak track on the abum, though, because I couldn’t find any.

For more on Port of Est check them out on Facebook and Soundcloud. The EP will be released on April 26.

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