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Jas Patrick’s ‘Inky Ovine’ is a unique EP built with sheer determination and willpower

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When it comes to new music, many artists today attempt to capture that lightning in a bottle and find a sound that’s proven popular so they can recreate it for themselves.

Some artists follow the formula more closer than others, but more often then not they’re looking for that brand of music where people can say “it sounds sort of like X, but also Y while also having some Z in it,” with X, Y and Z being already-established entities.

The fact that Jas Patrick doesn’t follow that is one reason why his new blues rock/Americana EP feels like such a breath of fresh air. He’s also likely one of the most unique singers I’ve heard in quite a while.

Jas Patrick
Jas Patrick

On “Inky Ovine,” he creates a sound that’s clearly somewhat established in well-known genres, but the way he expresses it is remarkably original.

His voice, for one, has a polish to it that cannot be ignored but at the same time it’s also at times spooky, at times joyous and other times it’s so unlike anything else I’ve heard that I can’t quite put a finger on how to explain it.

Each track on Inky Ovine feels like a well-drawn picture on it’s own. The opening track, “Harpy” for instance, is the most bluesy on the album, and therefore it’s also the most familiar sounding. I’m always a sucker for blues rock songs, and this one’s a solid one.

After that, though, is where things really start to get interesting.  Patrick’s voice on “Party Line (Classified)” emits a power that you just really have to hear for yourself. The way he repeats the lines “no you can’t, no you can’t, no you can’t” is likely the first place your ear will really focus in on. It’s an effective, yet simple, technique to grab listeners through repetition. The thing is, though, it doesn’t feel boring or amateurish, not at all.

While coming up with comparisons is tricky, in a way Patrick sounds a bit like  Gary Clark, Jr, Black Pistol Fire or Patrick Sweany. What’s interesting is how he mixes in Brit Rock influences with his Americana base. It helps add to the unique feel, most definitely.

Perhaps my favorite track on the album is “Little Bug.” It uses a soft melody with gentle background guitars and drums. This might not make much sense, but while listening to it I kept getting pictures of the movie “FernGully” in my head, maybe because it feels like a song that could have been in that movie, I’m not sure, but it’s also probably due to the name of the song, too!

I also found the story of how Patrick came to create this EP very inspirational. It all started  back in 2012, according to his official bio.

Frustrated by his recently-created EP, “Tributaries” he only had a small budget for limited studio time for the followup and the he said he felt the final product wasn’t meeting his high expectations.

And so with that he built a home studio piece by piece, which would in turn give him unlimited time to create his music. He saved up what he could when he could and finally in June 2014 he had everything he needed to start recording the album.

The first single, “Harpy” also features a video in which Patrick developed the concept, cast the actors, planned the shot list, built the set, directed the video and edited the final product. He said he even catered the shoot himself, too.

To me, Jas Patrick’s story is one that’s been built by an undying determination to do whatever it takes to create the type of art that he feels he can achieve. It’s a story not too unlike mine in that way.

Give “Inky Ovine” a listen and watch for the full LP, which does not have a release date just yet.

For more on Patrick, check him out on Facebook and Twitter.

Editor's Rating

9.4
On "Inky Ovine" Americana/blues rocker Jas Patrick has created an EP that features a unique set of songs that both entertain and intrigue.
0 User ratings
9.4

PROS

Patrick's voice sounds refreshingly original and is something that you just don't hear all too often these days. The songs stand on their own and feel like well-drawn aural pictures.

CONS

It's short at only six tracks, but Patrick reportedly has more songs he's working on for a full LP in the not-so-distant future.
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