Home»A FEATURED STORY»Interpretive Center to show documentary on renowned surveyor David Thompson
A FEATURED STORY/ALL EVENTS/ALL REVIEWS/BILLINGS Community/BILLINGS Fine Arts/BILLINGS Lectures/BILLINGS Music/BILLINGS Performances/BILLINGS Spotlight/BOZEMAN Community/BOZEMAN Fine Arts/BOZEMAN Lectures/BOZEMAN Music/BOZEMAN Performances/BOZEMAN Spotlight/BUTTE Community/BUTTE Fine Arts/BUTTE Lectures/BUTTE Music/BUTTE Performances/BUTTE Spotlight/COMMUNITY EVENTS/FINE ARTS/FLATHEAD AREA Community/FLATHEAD AREA Fine Arts/FLATHEAD AREA Lectures/FLATHEAD AREA Music/FLATHEAD AREA Performing/FLATHEAD AREA Spotlight/GREAT FALLS Community/GREAT FALLS Fine Arts/GREAT FALLS Lectures/GREAT FALLS Music/GREAT FALLS Performances/GREAT FALLS Spotlight/HELENA Community/HELENA Fine Arts/HELENA Lectures/HELENA Music/HELENA Performances/HELENA Spotlight/INDIE SPOTLIGHT/LECTURES/MISSOULA Community/MISSOULA Fine Arts/MISSOULA Lectures/MISSOULA Music/MISSOULA Performances/MISSOULA Spotlight/MMA/MOVIE REVIEWS/MUSIC/PERFORMING ARTS/REVIEW/Uncategorized

Interpretive Center to show documentary on renowned surveyor David Thompson

0
Shares
Pinterest Google+

While he’s relatively unknown in America, the British-Canadian fur trader, surveyor and map-maker David Thompson in Canada was considered a national hero during his life, and for good reason.

During his career, Thompson mapped over 1.5 million square miles of North America, earning him the title, “the greatest land geographer who ever lived.” Other names Thompson was known as include “Koo-Koo-Sint” or “The Stargazer.”

David ThompsonOn Thursday, the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center shows a documentary all about Mr. Thompson titled “Uncharted Territory: David Thompson on the Columbia Plateau.” The film focuses on the years 1807 through 1812, also the time that Thompson spent in the rocky mountains of Canada and northwestern U.S. It starts at 4 p.m. and is free to attend. The Interpretive Center is collecting food for the local food bank, as well.

While he lived all across the west, some of Thompson’s life was spent in Montana. For instance, in 1809 Thompson settled into the Saleesh House on the Clark Fork River near modern-day Thompson Falls, where he spent the winter. He later returned to Montana in the spring of 1812, where he traveled to the modern-day site of Missoula to view the route that Lewis and Clark had traveled. Later that year he made a trip to the south end of Flathead Lake.

The 58-minute documentary was produced by KSPS Public Television out of Spokane. Donations for Food Bank accepted. The Interpretive Center is located at 4201 Giant Springs Rd. in Great Falls. For more info on the film, check out the event’s Facebook page.

Previous post

The Sacramento Mermaids take a swim at the Sip-n-Dip on Friday and Saturday

Next post

Artist releases music video, chats about new storefront in Great Falls opening next month